Species:

Blue Rock-thrush (Monticola solitarius)

Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe)

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Length (cm):
20-20
14-15
Wingspan (cm):
33-37
26-32
Weight (gram):
57-64
18-29
Size group:
Thrush-size
Sparrow-size
Main Texts:
Appearance:

A slim, medium large thrush attached to rocky terrain, mountains or concrete buildings. Differs from Rufous-tailed Rock-Thrust, Monticola saxatilis in all plumages by long bill, and long, dark tail (not rufous). Bill and tail gives the bird an elongated appearance and profile. The tail reaches far behind the primaries when perched. Male unmistakable if seen well, but note that the bluish tones appears dark grey in unfavorable light. First winter males are barred underneath but gradually turns bluer and more evenly coloured. Immatures and females look alike with grey-brown upperparts and barred underparts, and are generally darker in throat and breast than M. saxatilis.

Sound:

Alarm call consists of short, soft whistles. Often two notes in sequence, the second one higher ("pjuu-eee"), and sometimes followed by series of dry "check" sounds. The song is a beautiful, melodious fluting which can be very difficult to distinguish from M. saxatilis. It generally has a more melancholic feel, with more tremulous fluting than the latter, with less lingering in the higher register. The structure is variable and simple, but sometimes more elaborate in song-flight or when including mimicry. Both sexes sing, but male most actively.

Song:

Error loading Flash for sound!
See sound file


Distribution:

Xeno-canto: map

Ecology:

Birdlife ecology

Links:

Observation.org Latest observations

Video IBC

Image search Flickr NB! May give other species

Sound search at Xeno-canto

Featherbase

CC

Appearance:

Epitome of wheatears. Male with grey back, white supercilium, black mask and dark wings. Females have less contrast, are more brownish than grey, the supercilium is fainter and the black mask is missing. Rump white and tail white with black "T" in all plumages. The black in the middle tail-feathers is always at least as long as the width of the black terminal tail-band. Pale individuals can be mistaken for Isabelline Wheatear, but note that the supercilium is buff between eye and base of bill.

Sound:

Contact and alarm call a high pitched, sharp "weet", followed by a hard "check", like hitting two rocks together. The "weet" sound is much sharper than the similar sound in Whinchat and Stonechat. Wheater usually repeats the "weet" sound more frequently than the "check" sound. The "check" of Stonechat is less pure and more gritty. The Wheatear song consists of short phrases with marked pauses. Each phrase is often introduced by the "weet" sound, then followed by hastened, creaking, rattling and warbling sounds of 1-2 seconds duration. The "check" sound is also often included in the song.

Song:

Error loading Flash for sound!
See sound file


Distribution:

Wikipedia: map (se also Xeno-canto below)

Ecology:

Birdlife ecology

Links:

Observation.org Latest observations

Video IBC

Image search Flickr NB! May give other species

Sound search at Xeno-canto

Featherbase

CC

Similar species (image):
Similar species (sound):
Silhouette Group:
Thrush-like
Silhouette
Thrush-like
Silhouette
Several different images of the species
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Several different sounds of the species